Transfer of 22 royal Pharaonic mummies to the Museum of East Cairo

In the “Pharaohs” procession, the Egyptian authorities transported, on Saturday, 18 mummies of kings and 4 queens, from the Museum of Central Cairo, to the last east, amidst unprecedented music and celebration in the country.

Historical mummies date back to the era of the Pharaonic families (about 1580 BC – 1085 BC), and among them was a mummy of King Ramses II (ruled from 1279 to 1213 BC).

The mummies also include King Seti the First, King Merenptah, King Seti II, Queen Ahmose Nefertari, Queen Merit Amun, King Sagnin Ra Taa, King Thutmose II, King Thutmose I, King Thutmose III, King Amenhotep II, King Amenhotep III, Queen Hatshepsut, and King Thutmose IV and Queen T.

According to a live broadcast broadcast by state television, groups wearing Pharaonic dress came to the tune of Pharaonic chariots music, emerging from the Tahrir Museum in downtown Cairo, empty of pedestrians and citizens.

With the path of vehicles carrying mummies, from Tahrir Square, television was showing simultaneous footage of the presence of President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, senior officials and Arab and international figures in the Museum of Civilization, east of the capital, where they were waiting for the procession with its golden carriages engraved with Pharaonic drawings.

The movement of the mummies’ procession coincided with unprecedented scenes, including the lights emerging from the obelisk of Tahrir Square and from the various roads surrounding the procession.

“I look forward to receiving the kings and queens of Egypt after their journey from the Egyptian Museum to Tahrir to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in this majestic scene,” Al-Sisi said through his verified account on Twitter, ahead of the procession.

In conjunction with the transfer of the mummies, the Museum of Civilization witnessed a ceremony attended by the Egyptian President that brought together singing, musical and pharaonic performances in which artists from Egypt participated, including Yusra, Ahmed El-Sakka, Ahmed Helmy and Ahmed Ezz, along with Tunisian Hend Sabry, according to what was reported by the TV broadcast.

And, “The procession is the first in the history of Egypt that brings these kings together, according to previous statements made by Ahmed Ghoneim, CEO of the Museum of Civilization Authority in Fustat.”

Regarding the reason for the transfer of mummies, former Minister of Antiquities Zahi Hawass said that it is due to “the desire of those in charge of antiquities to display the mummies in a scientific way that includes the king and some of his antiquities,” according to what was quoted by the newspaper “Al-Watan” (in particular).

Hawass added, “All that was taken was according to the results of studies that were carried out, which are devoid of excitement, as well as work to diversify the sources of tourist attractions in Egypt, including the decision to transfer royal mummies to the Museum of Civilization.”

The mummies that were discovered in two batches from a site in southern Egypt in 1871 and 1898 were prepared to be an icon in the Museum of Civilization, to attract visitors to it, according to data from the Ministry of Tourism.
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