The Renaissance Dam crisis Egypt is moving internationally to strengthen its position

Egypt has intensified its international moves recently in an attempt to strengthen its position regarding the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam crisis, and to reach a solution acceptable to all parties.

The latest of these international moves was the intensive meetings that Ambassador Ahmed Abu Zeid, Egypt’s ambassador to Canada, held with members of the House of Commons and the Canadian Senate representing all political parties, to present Egypt’s vision towards the Renaissance Dam crisis.

A statement by the Egyptian Foreign Ministry said that the ambassador’s meetings in Canada, which also include members of the Canadian-Egyptian Parliamentary Friendship Committee, aim to acquaint members of the Canadian Parliament with the fairness of the Egyptian position on the Nile water issue, and the dangers of any unilateral measures taken by Ethiopia that would harm Egypt’s water security.

In addition, Egypt will continue to adhere to the negotiating approach if the other party has the real will to reach a consensual solution, according to the statement.

Egypt blames Ethiopia for the failure of the decade-long negotiations over the dam that Addis Ababa is building on the Blue Nile, and Cairo fears its impact on its share of the Nile water.

Ethiopia rejects the Egyptian accusation and holds it and Sudan, in return, for the failure of negotiations, and stresses that the dam will not affect the two downstream countries.

The Egyptian ambassador to Ottawa said, in statements conveyed by the statement, that “the meetings with the Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee in the House of Commons Seven Spingman, the members of the Canadian House of Commons and the Senate, and the Chairman and members of the Canadian-Egyptian Friendship Group in Parliament, reflected a full understanding of the importance of the Nile River to Egypt, and Convinced of the necessity to abide by the provisions of international law related to international rivers.

He added, “Members of Parliament affirmed that Canada applies these principles in its management of shared water resources with the United States, and that its experience confirms that cooperation and a negotiating approach aimed at achieving common interests and not harming the other is the right approach that must be followed away from taking unilateral measures aimed at imposing The reality”.

Ambassador Abu Zeid added that he discussed several proposals and ideas with members of Parliament aimed at activating the Canadian role in supporting efforts to reach a comprehensive and urgent agreement on the rules for filling and operating the Renaissance Dam, and that he was keen to explain the details of the tripartite negotiations over the past ten years, and the reasons for their stumbling due to the absence The political will for a solution is on the Ethiopian side. ”

He stressed that “the current stalemate represents a great threat to the stability of the region and the interests of its international partners, including Canada, if Ethiopia decides to implement its declaration to start the second filling, regardless of the results of the negotiations.”

It was agreed to continue consultations and coordination between the Egyptian ambassador and members of the Canadian Parliament to follow up the developments of the situation during the next stage.

African Movements

The Egyptian Foreign Minister, Sameh Shoukry, recently conducted an African tour that included several countries within the framework of the Egyptian efforts to find a solution to the Renaissance Dam crisis, and to inform countries about the efforts made by his country to reach a fair, fair and legal agreement.

The tour included several countries, including Tunisia, whose president, Qais Said, affirmed his country’s firm support for Egypt with regard to the Renaissance Dam file.

He stressed standing by Egypt in various regional and international forums in order to reach a negotiated and just solution to the Renaissance Dam file, in a way that preserves the historical rights of the Egyptian people in the waters of the Nile, explaining that “Egyptian national security is a fundamental pillar of Arab national security.”

Shukri also briefed Niger, a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council, during a visit within the framework of his African tour, on the latest developments in the Renaissance Dam file.

Shoukry delivered a letter addressed by President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi to the President of Niger, in which “I dealt with the latest developments in the Renaissance Dam file and Egypt’s position towards it.”

He explained that “this comes within the framework of Egypt’s keenness to consult with brotherly Niger, in light of their distinguished relations and Niger’s currently non-permanent membership in the Security Council represented by the African continent.”

In this regard, the Egyptian Foreign Minister said that his country, during the Kinshasa meetings, had a political will to launch a serious negotiation process that would result in a binding legal agreement on filling and operating the Renaissance Dam.

Shoukry stressed that Cairo is looking forward to working with various countries and parties concerned to solve the issue of the Renaissance Dam, in a way that avoids compromising the security and stability of the region.

Shukri’s African tour also included Kenya, then Comoros and South Africa, during which the heads of these countries delivered messages from the Egyptian President, on the issue of the Renaissance Dam.

The second filling of the dam without reaching a binding agreement is the most sensitive point of disagreement between Ethiopia on the one hand, and Egypt and Sudan on the other hand. Cairo and Ethiopia exchange accusations about the responsibility for the failure of the negotiations.

The negotiations of Egypt, Sudan (the downstream countries) and Ethiopia (the upstream country) in their last round, which was held in the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kinshasa, at the beginning of this month, failed to reach a binding agreement on the dam that Addis Ababa is building on the Blue Nile, and Cairo and Khartoum fear its potential negative effects.
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